Jake Broadway

Mar 3

It’s Us, It’s Us! Promo Video 2012

http://its-us-its-us.tumblr.com/

Feb 28

It’s Us! It’s Us! Part 2 - The Turbine House, Reading

Feb 28

It’s Us! It’s Us! Part 1 - The Motorcycle Showroom Bristol

Feb 28

New Work: London Mask Series


It’s Us, It’s Us!

Since before the end of last year, with a group of other artists from Reading and UWE Bristol, I’ve been involved in helping curate a collaborative exhibition between the two art schools. The exhibition poster is shown here. Part 1 at the Motorcycle Showroom Bristol was really fantastic, and the people we met from UWE did an outstanding job putting it together. I’ll be posting pictures of the event soon along with more images of things I’ve been working on this term. The Private View of Part 2 of the exhibition held in Reading’s Turbine House (part of the Reading Museum on Blake’s Lock) will be held this Thursday the 23rd of February, and if all goes to plan, should prove to be an event not to be missed!
Feb 20

It’s Us, It’s Us!

Since before the end of last year, with a group of other artists from Reading and UWE Bristol, I’ve been involved in helping curate a collaborative exhibition between the two art schools. The exhibition poster is shown here. Part 1 at the Motorcycle Showroom Bristol was really fantastic, and the people we met from UWE did an outstanding job putting it together. I’ll be posting pictures of the event soon along with more images of things I’ve been working on this term. The Private View of Part 2 of the exhibition held in Reading’s Turbine House (part of the Reading Museum on Blake’s Lock) will be held this Thursday the 23rd of February, and if all goes to plan, should prove to be an event not to be missed!

Feb 15

Chandelier piece and Influence of s[edition] - ‘art to download’

I decided to create a chandelier as a focal point, like a relic or religious object for viewers to gaze at, normally an expensive object to buy, I used the chandelier as a means of portraying societies following of consumer objects and acceptance of capitalism and an obsession with image. Instead of it being made of anything particularly valuable or precious, I made it using plain fabric, which I found emphasized the moiré of the projections, which I intended to show on it. The fabric with the ‘iconic image’ animations on them to me represented the entire idea of the spectacle, even though it looked ‘spectacular’ it was a kind of façade, there was nothing particularly valuable about it, it was superficial much like a consumer object, interesting only aesthetically.

It could be argued that the art market until recently has been detached from this digital commercialism attached to the internet – in art we are often seeking the ‘original’ or ‘authentic’, and so institutions and galleries survive. However recently we have seen the release of s[edition], a website where people are invited to purchase digital editions of contemporary artworks for prices of up to £500. Are we expected to accept this transition in art as a refreshingly new and inventive means of distributing artwork? I read an article on theguardian.co.uk questioning the capitalist aspect of this, asking weather it is ‘little more than dead eyed commercialism’?

 

Responding to these discussed ideas, I created a memorable symbolic representation of my work. It appears as a globe, responding to the worldwide web and the ways in which digitizing commercialism has influenced my practice, and how it could be readily viewed. At the same time it is a spectacle, and can also be viewed as a commercial object, like a logo, addressing our obsession and desire to identify with the image.

Feb 15

Autumn/Winter 2011 in London

There was so much art that interested me in London at the end of last year, so I decided to include some images of what I saw. Some of the main inspiration for the presentation of my works and my practice was from the Pippilotti Rist exhibition ‘Eyeball Massage’ at the Hayward Gallery. She really pushes the boundaries of what ‘installation’ art really is, and isn’t afraid to go all out on the spectacle in her presentation of it. It was such an eye-opening exhibition, really atmospheric and very beautiful. One of my favourite pieces was the very playful ‘Massachusetts Chandelier’, which I’ve included an image of here. The images of the body which Rist uses in her work, moved in a mesmerisingly and almost in a hypnotic way over the structure. The piece itself was made of underwear she’d collected from people close to her, describing the abdomen as ‘the temple’ of the human body, and respectfully paying homage to it, presenting it as something that becomes pleasing to look at aesthetically. 

Tacita Dean’s ‘FILM’ in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern was also something of a visual spectacle to see. Her focus was on the physical use of 35mm film. She cuts and colours the films in ways that keep the viewer watching, the images themselves to me almost became redundant in this respect - it was what was done with them that became interesting. I was in a sense working against this idea of nostalgia, cutting at digital images in my films, but this made for an interesting parallel. 

Finally shown here is work by Richard Gaplin I saw at the Hayles Gallery, in the TEA building, London. He uses a particularly stylized technique of cutting up digital photographs of certain places familiar to him. Some aspects of architecture or things like road signs and scaffolding can be made out in the tiny splices of the imagery. The stylized approach he uses to his work gave it individuality and made it function more as an artwork than just a picture or image. I thought consequently about using stylized techniques in my work in order to maintain a focus and element of chance in seeing what is recognizable after cutting up an image at random.

Other artists work I saw that interested me last term included work by Ed Atkins and Marc Camille Chaimowicz at TATE Britain, the brilliant Gehard Richter retrospective show at TATE Modern, George Condo’s ‘Mental States’ at the Hayward, and also The Bloomberg Commission at the Whitechapel Gallery by Josiah McElheny, ‘The Past Was A Mirage I Had Left Far Behind’, for which I’ve provided a link with a video showing this fascinating installation work. 

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/the-bloomberg-commission-josiah-mcelheny-the-past-was-a-mirage-i-had-left-far-behind

 

Feb 15

Mannequin Projections

I used the mannequin for projecting my piece for The Bunker exhibition, as well as for other pieces. The way the images fell on the structure interested me particularly, in the moiré and pixelation. I liked to think about the way the bright colours and flickering imagery made my films become like adverts. There were particular aspects about them and the iconic images that were recognisable from them when looked upon at specific moments, sometimes clearer to some people more than others. The physicality of the mannequin became merged with ways we are targeted through digital advertising, re-presenting imagery we have seen hundreds of times before, and recognise because of the hyper-saturation of images in our digital society. The images here become very aesthetically stylish, like digital commodities themselves.

Feb 15

The Bunker Presents…

At the beginning of last term, I was involved in a collaborative exhibition organised by other central gallery committee members and myself. We named the space ‘The Bunker’ to establish it more as a specific area for which people could submit proposals for exhibitions and shows. To demonstrate the uses of the space, we put on an initial exhibition including our own work, and other third year pieces, in an opening exhibition entitled ‘The Bunker Presents’. I have included some images of my pieces.